{"_id":"56961d937596a90d0014e571","version":{"_id":"55d535cb988e130d000b3f5f","__v":12,"project":"55d535ca988e130d000b3f5c","hasDoc":true,"hasReference":false,"createdAt":"2015-08-20T02:04:59.052Z","releaseDate":"2015-08-20T02:04:59.052Z","categories":["55d535cc988e130d000b3f60","55d6b238d2a8eb1900109eef","55d6b4f3250d7d0d004274cd","55d7967960fc730d00fc2852","55da9804e835f20d009fc5d0","55e75b1de06f4b190080dbfd","55e75b39e06f4b190080dbfe","55e75b7ae06f4b190080dbff","564f5a4e33082f0d001bb709","570fb64aa38d470e0060cbff","586d0dd89a854123001acd65","586d0e3b9a854123001acd66"],"is_deprecated":false,"is_hidden":false,"is_beta":false,"is_stable":true,"codename":"","version_clean":"1.0.0","version":"1.0"},"project":"55d535ca988e130d000b3f5c","category":{"_id":"55e75b39e06f4b190080dbfe","project":"55d535ca988e130d000b3f5c","__v":10,"pages":["56959043fe18811700c9c09e","569590bfcb14e11700f8a877","569590f7fcb1032d0089e033","5695917dfcb1032d0089e035","5695964a77ba0d2300cf3912","5695967edcaf0d1700cb8752","569618eccb14e11700f8a910","56961d937596a90d0014e571","5696ba13480534370022a37a","56dd002ee5c8570e00a79865"],"version":"55d535cb988e130d000b3f5f","sync":{"url":"","isSync":false},"reference":false,"createdAt":"2015-09-02T20:25:29.622Z","from_sync":false,"order":3,"slug":"frame-for-business","title":"Frame for Business"},"user":"55d535835082980d0009c965","__v":15,"parentDoc":null,"updates":[],"next":{"pages":[],"description":""},"createdAt":"2016-01-13T09:49:07.009Z","link_external":false,"link_url":"","githubsync":"","sync_unique":"","hidden":false,"api":{"results":{"codes":[]},"settings":"","auth":"required","params":[],"url":""},"isReference":false,"order":11,"body":"Frame gives you a variety of tools to see exactly how your account is being used. Navigate to the \"Analytics\" panel in your Dashboard, and you'll see this page with a variety of tabs:\n[block:image]\n{\n  \"images\": [\n    {\n      \"image\": [\n        \"https://files.readme.io/i2lUPdjQsyI0A3FHEChz_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.48.08.png\",\n        \"Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.48.08.png\",\n        \"1379\",\n        \"721\",\n        \"#3d7cb4\",\n        \"\"\n      ]\n    }\n  ]\n}\n[/block]\n\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Active sessions\"\n}\n[/block]\nThe first tab, \"Active Sessions,\" shows you a listing of all users currently connected to your system. In addition to seeing basic information like the user's email and session start time, you can also force a session to end by clicking on \"CLOSE.\"\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Status bar\"\n}\n[/block]\nOn this page, and on all pages in your Dashboard, you will also see important information displayed in the grey status bar at the bottom of the page:\n[block:image]\n{\n  \"images\": [\n    {\n      \"image\": [\n        \"https://files.readme.io/8oVWE8KRXmtXTW7csTKQ_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.51.08.png\",\n        \"Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.51.08.png\",\n        \"780\",\n        \"24\",\n        \"#dbe3e3\",\n        \"\"\n      ],\n      \"caption\": \"\"\n    }\n  ]\n}\n[/block]\nThis status bar gives you an overview of what's going on in your account at a glance. First, you'll see the date when you last published your applications. This timestamp can be considered the \"version\" of your Sandbox that is now in production. Next, you'll see a series of items that tell you what systems are currently active. \n\n\"S: 0/0\" tells you the state of your Sandbox. The first number represents whether an admin is running a session in the Sandbox (in this case none) and the second number tells you if the Sandbox is on or off (1 means on, 0 means off).  \n\nThe next set of items shows you the status of each of your production pools.  The **bold** item is your default pool.  The first number for each pool shows how many users are currently in sessions.  The second number is how many systems are powered on.  The third is the \"max\" setting for that pool.  \n\nIn the example below, the Air 4GB pool has one active user running on one available instance out of a max of five. You can mouse over any of the items for a reminder of what they represent:\n[block:image]\n{\n  \"images\": [\n    {\n      \"image\": [\n        \"https://files.readme.io/ePBEMq0kSSujAU2qVX7U_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.57.34.png\",\n        \"Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.57.34.png\",\n        \"191\",\n        \"143\",\n        \"#b4b4b4\",\n        \"\"\n      ]\n    }\n  ]\n}\n[/block]\nThe last item in the status bar shows you the state of your utility server. For example, \"U: 0/0\" means that no admin is connected to the utility server and it is not powered on.\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Daily sessions\"\n}\n[/block]\nThe \"Daily Sessions\" tab shows you a plot of the number of sessions per day during a given time interval. Note that you can download a .csv with even more detailed session analytics from the bottom of this page:\n[block:image]\n{\n  \"images\": [\n    {\n      \"image\": [\n        \"https://files.readme.io/4i08IFTTayKC39lTVUUw_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.35.48.png\",\n        \"Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.35.48.png\",\n        \"1383\",\n        \"891\",\n        \"#3b79b0\",\n        \"\"\n      ]\n    }\n  ]\n}\n[/block]\nOnce inside the CSV file, you'll be able to see a variety of useful information-- including the name of the application used to start the session, latency and bandwidth data, the user's email address, other started applications, and more. Note that only sessions that successfully connected are included in the CSV file, so the number of entries may be lower than what's reported under Total sessions (see graph above).  \n[block:image]\n{\n  \"images\": [\n    {\n      \"image\": [\n        \"https://files.readme.io/1844e5c-Screenshot_2016-09-02_10.42.33.png\",\n        \"Screenshot 2016-09-02 10.42.33.png\",\n        1391,\n        91,\n        \"#d5d6d0\"\n      ]\n    }\n  ]\n}\n[/block]\n\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Detailed session data\"\n}\n[/block]\nFollowing is a description of each of the columns in the .csv file (downloaded from the Sessions tab) for reference:\n\n- **User email**:  if authenticated, the user's email is listed here. For anonymous sessions (e.g. when using the embedded player with Frame Platform), a unique ID is used here.\n\n- **Application name**:  the name of the application used to start the session.\n\n- **Distance**:  the approximate distance between the user and the data center based on the geo-location of the end user's IP address. Note that this is only as accurate as the location registered with the user's IP address (some ISPs do not properly register the location of their IP addresses). In general, we recommend that users are within 1000 miles of the data center for the best performance.\n\n- **City**:  the city reported by the end user's geo-location associated with their IP address (again, this may not always be accurate).  \n\n- **Session start**: the date and time in US Pacific Standard Time when the session was started.\n\n- **Session duration**:  the total duration of the session in seconds.\n\n- **Average b/w (kbps)**:  this is the average bandwidth of the connection measured by Frame at the *start of the session*. Frame takes several measurements at the start of the session in order to set the initial parameters for its quality of service (QoS) system which ensures the best possible performance given the end user's specific network conditions. This value tells you about the strength of the user's connection. For example, a low value (e.g. under 1000 kbps = 1 Mbps) will tell you that the user's connection is not very good, and they may see some performance issues. In general, Frame recommends at least 3 Mbps for typical productivity applications.  For 3D applications or use cases requiring resolutions greater than HD (1080x720), 5 Mbps or more is recommended.\n\n- **Average latency**: this is the average measured one-way latency across the duration of the session. This is an indicator of how responsive the session felt to the user. In general, values under 100 ms will indicate a normal session with little to no observed \"lag\" by the user. Values between 100 and 200 ms will still indicate a good session, but the user may have perceived some minor impact. Values over 200 ms may indicate either a sustained issue during the session (e.g. the user is very far from the datacenter), or if their connection was not consistent, it could indicate periods of fine performance mixed with periods of high latency (e.g. they are on a congested network). The real-time measurements of latency reported in the session's status bar will then be useful to determine the root cause of higher latency measures.\n\n- **Average bitrate**:  this is the average of the maximum bitrate (kbps) allowed by the Frame QoS system across the whole session. Based on Frame's measurements of a user's connection, Frame will cap the allowable bitrate used at any given time. During the course of the session, this cap may move up and down based on changes in the network connection. Frame automatically adjusts this cap, and the value in this column reflects the average of this cap. Thus, if you see a very low Average bitrate, it tells you that the available bandwidth across the user's entire session was not good either. Note that this value should NOT be confused with a measure of the actual bitrate used by the user (it would be a much lower value in general). \n\n- **Average frame-rate**:  this is the average of the maximum frame rate (frames per second) allowed by the Frame QoS system across the whole session. This is similar to the average of the maximum allowed bitrate mentioned above - but translates to a more easily interpreted value from an end-user usability perspective. For most applications, a frame rate of 15 fps or higher will translate to a good user experience. Lower values will impact users that are using fast moving content (e.g. rotating a 3D model or watching a video). \n\n- **Resolution**:  the starting screen resolution for the session.\n\n- **User agent**:  this identifies the specific browser used by the end user. You can use a [lookup service](https://www.whatismybrowser.com/developers/tools/user-agent-parser/) to translate this to the browser, version, and platform/OS being used.\n\n- **User IP**: the end user's public IP address\n\n- **System Type**:  the Frame instance type the user was running on.\n\n- **Session Type**:  tells you whether the session was on the Sandbox, a production instance or the Utility Server.\n\n- **Started Applications**: a comma separated list of the additional applications started during the course of the session.  Note that this list does NOT include the original application that was used to start the session (you can get this from the \"Application Name\" column).  To get the list of all applications used in the session, simply concatenate the two columns.\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Hourly usage\"\n}\n[/block]\nSimilarly, the \"Hours\" tab shows the amount of hours consumed per specified time interval. You can filter this chart and download the detailed data points via .csv as well:\n[block:image]\n{\n  \"images\": [\n    {\n      \"image\": [\n        \"https://files.readme.io/tkkocNQRSTKOXjphCiTd_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.37.00.png\",\n        \"Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.37.00.png\",\n        \"1383\",\n        \"891\",\n        \"#3b79b0\",\n        \"\"\n      ]\n    }\n  ]\n}\n[/block]\n\n[block:callout]\n{\n  \"type\": \"info\",\n  \"title\": \"Hours used total\",\n  \"body\": \"Note that your Dashboard will always display the \\\"Hours Used\\\" in the lower left hand corner of the Dashboard (in this example:  3271 hours).  If you are on a Frame subscription that is automatically paid via a credit card, this value will show the number of hours used since the start of your current billing cycle.  If you are not using automated credit card billing, this value will show the total cumulative hours used since the creation of the account.\"\n}\n[/block]\n\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Elasticity history\"\n}\n[/block]\nFor accounts with many users (e.g. >100 users on Frame for Business/Education and Frame Platform), the Elasticity tab provides additional detail for evaluating the performance of your capacity settings (min, max and buffer). The most important part of this chart lets you compare the active sessions (represents users that are connecting) to active instances (the number of systems that are powered on and are consuming usage hours). For example, if you find that your active instances are always much higher than your active sessions, then you should consider lowering your \"min\" and \"buffer\" settings. \n[block:image]\n{\n  \"images\": [\n    {\n      \"image\": [\n        \"https://files.readme.io/nAATzq7eT9mx0j9rykw4_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.39.06.png\",\n        \"Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.39.06.png\",\n        \"1381\",\n        \"720\",\n        \"#3d7aae\",\n        \"\"\n      ]\n    }\n  ]\n}\n[/block]\nIf you would like the Elasticity tab feature added to your account, please contact [support:::at:::fra.me](mailto:support@fra.me). \n\nThe last tab shown, \"Feedback,\" is feature for Frame Platform that lets you collect comments from your end users. Please see the Frame Platform section for more details.","excerpt":"Know what's going on","slug":"analytics","type":"basic","title":"Analytics"}

Analytics

Know what's going on

Frame gives you a variety of tools to see exactly how your account is being used. Navigate to the "Analytics" panel in your Dashboard, and you'll see this page with a variety of tabs: [block:image] { "images": [ { "image": [ "https://files.readme.io/i2lUPdjQsyI0A3FHEChz_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.48.08.png", "Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.48.08.png", "1379", "721", "#3d7cb4", "" ] } ] } [/block] [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Active sessions" } [/block] The first tab, "Active Sessions," shows you a listing of all users currently connected to your system. In addition to seeing basic information like the user's email and session start time, you can also force a session to end by clicking on "CLOSE." [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Status bar" } [/block] On this page, and on all pages in your Dashboard, you will also see important information displayed in the grey status bar at the bottom of the page: [block:image] { "images": [ { "image": [ "https://files.readme.io/8oVWE8KRXmtXTW7csTKQ_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.51.08.png", "Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.51.08.png", "780", "24", "#dbe3e3", "" ], "caption": "" } ] } [/block] This status bar gives you an overview of what's going on in your account at a glance. First, you'll see the date when you last published your applications. This timestamp can be considered the "version" of your Sandbox that is now in production. Next, you'll see a series of items that tell you what systems are currently active. "S: 0/0" tells you the state of your Sandbox. The first number represents whether an admin is running a session in the Sandbox (in this case none) and the second number tells you if the Sandbox is on or off (1 means on, 0 means off). The next set of items shows you the status of each of your production pools. The **bold** item is your default pool. The first number for each pool shows how many users are currently in sessions. The second number is how many systems are powered on. The third is the "max" setting for that pool. In the example below, the Air 4GB pool has one active user running on one available instance out of a max of five. You can mouse over any of the items for a reminder of what they represent: [block:image] { "images": [ { "image": [ "https://files.readme.io/ePBEMq0kSSujAU2qVX7U_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.57.34.png", "Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.57.34.png", "191", "143", "#b4b4b4", "" ] } ] } [/block] The last item in the status bar shows you the state of your utility server. For example, "U: 0/0" means that no admin is connected to the utility server and it is not powered on. [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Daily sessions" } [/block] The "Daily Sessions" tab shows you a plot of the number of sessions per day during a given time interval. Note that you can download a .csv with even more detailed session analytics from the bottom of this page: [block:image] { "images": [ { "image": [ "https://files.readme.io/4i08IFTTayKC39lTVUUw_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.35.48.png", "Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.35.48.png", "1383", "891", "#3b79b0", "" ] } ] } [/block] Once inside the CSV file, you'll be able to see a variety of useful information-- including the name of the application used to start the session, latency and bandwidth data, the user's email address, other started applications, and more. Note that only sessions that successfully connected are included in the CSV file, so the number of entries may be lower than what's reported under Total sessions (see graph above). [block:image] { "images": [ { "image": [ "https://files.readme.io/1844e5c-Screenshot_2016-09-02_10.42.33.png", "Screenshot 2016-09-02 10.42.33.png", 1391, 91, "#d5d6d0" ] } ] } [/block] [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Detailed session data" } [/block] Following is a description of each of the columns in the .csv file (downloaded from the Sessions tab) for reference: - **User email**: if authenticated, the user's email is listed here. For anonymous sessions (e.g. when using the embedded player with Frame Platform), a unique ID is used here. - **Application name**: the name of the application used to start the session. - **Distance**: the approximate distance between the user and the data center based on the geo-location of the end user's IP address. Note that this is only as accurate as the location registered with the user's IP address (some ISPs do not properly register the location of their IP addresses). In general, we recommend that users are within 1000 miles of the data center for the best performance. - **City**: the city reported by the end user's geo-location associated with their IP address (again, this may not always be accurate). - **Session start**: the date and time in US Pacific Standard Time when the session was started. - **Session duration**: the total duration of the session in seconds. - **Average b/w (kbps)**: this is the average bandwidth of the connection measured by Frame at the *start of the session*. Frame takes several measurements at the start of the session in order to set the initial parameters for its quality of service (QoS) system which ensures the best possible performance given the end user's specific network conditions. This value tells you about the strength of the user's connection. For example, a low value (e.g. under 1000 kbps = 1 Mbps) will tell you that the user's connection is not very good, and they may see some performance issues. In general, Frame recommends at least 3 Mbps for typical productivity applications. For 3D applications or use cases requiring resolutions greater than HD (1080x720), 5 Mbps or more is recommended. - **Average latency**: this is the average measured one-way latency across the duration of the session. This is an indicator of how responsive the session felt to the user. In general, values under 100 ms will indicate a normal session with little to no observed "lag" by the user. Values between 100 and 200 ms will still indicate a good session, but the user may have perceived some minor impact. Values over 200 ms may indicate either a sustained issue during the session (e.g. the user is very far from the datacenter), or if their connection was not consistent, it could indicate periods of fine performance mixed with periods of high latency (e.g. they are on a congested network). The real-time measurements of latency reported in the session's status bar will then be useful to determine the root cause of higher latency measures. - **Average bitrate**: this is the average of the maximum bitrate (kbps) allowed by the Frame QoS system across the whole session. Based on Frame's measurements of a user's connection, Frame will cap the allowable bitrate used at any given time. During the course of the session, this cap may move up and down based on changes in the network connection. Frame automatically adjusts this cap, and the value in this column reflects the average of this cap. Thus, if you see a very low Average bitrate, it tells you that the available bandwidth across the user's entire session was not good either. Note that this value should NOT be confused with a measure of the actual bitrate used by the user (it would be a much lower value in general). - **Average frame-rate**: this is the average of the maximum frame rate (frames per second) allowed by the Frame QoS system across the whole session. This is similar to the average of the maximum allowed bitrate mentioned above - but translates to a more easily interpreted value from an end-user usability perspective. For most applications, a frame rate of 15 fps or higher will translate to a good user experience. Lower values will impact users that are using fast moving content (e.g. rotating a 3D model or watching a video). - **Resolution**: the starting screen resolution for the session. - **User agent**: this identifies the specific browser used by the end user. You can use a [lookup service](https://www.whatismybrowser.com/developers/tools/user-agent-parser/) to translate this to the browser, version, and platform/OS being used. - **User IP**: the end user's public IP address - **System Type**: the Frame instance type the user was running on. - **Session Type**: tells you whether the session was on the Sandbox, a production instance or the Utility Server. - **Started Applications**: a comma separated list of the additional applications started during the course of the session. Note that this list does NOT include the original application that was used to start the session (you can get this from the "Application Name" column). To get the list of all applications used in the session, simply concatenate the two columns. [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Hourly usage" } [/block] Similarly, the "Hours" tab shows the amount of hours consumed per specified time interval. You can filter this chart and download the detailed data points via .csv as well: [block:image] { "images": [ { "image": [ "https://files.readme.io/tkkocNQRSTKOXjphCiTd_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.37.00.png", "Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.37.00.png", "1383", "891", "#3b79b0", "" ] } ] } [/block] [block:callout] { "type": "info", "title": "Hours used total", "body": "Note that your Dashboard will always display the \"Hours Used\" in the lower left hand corner of the Dashboard (in this example: 3271 hours). If you are on a Frame subscription that is automatically paid via a credit card, this value will show the number of hours used since the start of your current billing cycle. If you are not using automated credit card billing, this value will show the total cumulative hours used since the creation of the account." } [/block] [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Elasticity history" } [/block] For accounts with many users (e.g. >100 users on Frame for Business/Education and Frame Platform), the Elasticity tab provides additional detail for evaluating the performance of your capacity settings (min, max and buffer). The most important part of this chart lets you compare the active sessions (represents users that are connecting) to active instances (the number of systems that are powered on and are consuming usage hours). For example, if you find that your active instances are always much higher than your active sessions, then you should consider lowering your "min" and "buffer" settings. [block:image] { "images": [ { "image": [ "https://files.readme.io/nAATzq7eT9mx0j9rykw4_Screenshot%202016-02-29%2018.39.06.png", "Screenshot 2016-02-29 18.39.06.png", "1381", "720", "#3d7aae", "" ] } ] } [/block] If you would like the Elasticity tab feature added to your account, please contact [support@fra.me](mailto:support@fra.me). The last tab shown, "Feedback," is feature for Frame Platform that lets you collect comments from your end users. Please see the Frame Platform section for more details.