Skip to main content

10 posts tagged with "jnorman"

View All Tags

5 min read
Jake Norman

Application Optimizations Essentials

In previous blogs, we talked about optimizations as they related to the Windows Operating System, including Active Setup, the Microsoft Store, Services and Scheduled Tasks, and more. Due to the number of items that can be optimized in each section those blogs were necessarily a little longer in length.

The focus of this blog series will be Application Optimizations. We started this series with our Introduction to Application Optimization, which showcases common items to look for when it comes to Application Optimization. We followed up with Application Optimization Essentials: Google Chrome, then soldiered on with Application Optimization Essentials: Microsoft Edge. This blog will deep dive into another one of the most commonly used browsers: Mozilla Firefox.

15 min read
Jake Norman

Windows OS Optimization Essentials - Part 5

Operating systems can end up being a lot of work for administrators: work to configure the image, work to install the applications, and work to provide the best user experience possible. As with any software, what is provided to you is what the developer intended, but not necessarily what you want or need for your end users.

This blog series introduces you to Windows Operating System (OS) optimizations, starting with version 21H2. I will attempt to keep these optimizations as environment agnostic as possible. Hopefully, these optimizations will be just as good to administrators of physical machines as to a virtual environment utilizing Nutanix Frame, Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops, or VMware Horizon.

This series aims to share the seemingly infinite number of ways you can optimize a Windows environment, with something for beginners as well as administrators familiar with optimizations but looking to deliver an even better experience within their environment.

Of course, the optimizations provided in this blog series are intended only as a guide. Be sure to vet any optimizations carefully and test the optimizations described in this series internally before pushing the changes to your production environment.

The first entry covered Active Setup. The second entry covered the Microsoft Store. The third entry covered Services and Scheduled Tasks. The fourth entry covered Startup Items. In each case, we discussed what each piece is, how it works, and how to optimize it.

This blog addresses three smaller aspects of your Windows Operating System: Autologgers, Features On-Demand, and Optional Features. While these three items are smaller than any of the previous blogs individually, there are some definite optimization efforts to be considered here.

4 min read
Jake Norman

Frame Image Management: Onboarding and Configuring SaaS Applications

Scenario: As a customer, you want to use Frame to provide access to Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) applications. SaaS applications are also known as web-based software applications, meaning your main form of access to the application is through a web browser, such as Google Chrome or Microsoft Edge. You want to utilize the Application Experience to provide these applications to your users. With Frame, how do you accomplish this?

6 min read
Jake Norman

Application Optimization Essentials: Edge

In previous blog posts, we talked about optimizations as they related to the Windows Operating System, including Active Setup, the Microsoft Store, Services & Scheduled Tasks, and more. Due to the number of items that can be optimized in each section, those blog posts were (necessarily) a little longer in length.

This blog series will focus on application optimizations. We started this series with our Introduction to Application Optimization, which showcases common items to look for when it comes to application optimization. We followed up with Application Optimization Essentials: Google Chrome. This blog will deep dive into one of the most commonly used browsers: Microsoft Edge of the Chromium variety.

9 min read
Jake Norman

Application Optimizations Essentials: Google Chrome

In previous blogs, we talked about optimizations as they related to the Windows Operating System, including Active Setup, the Microsoft Store, Services & Scheduled Tasks, and more. Due to the number of items that can be optimized in each section those blogs were necessarily a little longer in length.

The focus of this blog series will be Application Optimizations. We started this series with our Introduction to Application Optimization, which showcases common items to look for when it comes to Application Optimization. This blog will deep dive into one of the most commonly used browsers Google Chrome.

7 min read
Jake Norman

Application Optimizations Essentials

In previous blog posts, we talked about optimizations as they related to the Windows Operating System, including Active Setup, the Microsoft Store, Services and Scheduled Tasks, and more. Due to the number of items that can be optimized in each section, those blog posts were necessarily a little longer in length.

20 min read
Jake Norman

Operating systems can be a lot of work for administrators 鈥 work to configure the image, work to install the applications, and work to provide the best user experience possible. As with any software, what is provided to you is what the developer intended, but not necessarily what you want or need for your end users.

This blog series introduces you to Windows庐 Operating System (OS) optimizations, starting with version 1903. I will attempt to keep these optimizations as environment agnostic as possible. Hopefully, these optimizations will be just as good to administrators of physical machines as to a virtual environment utilizing Nutanix Frame庐, Citrix庐 Virtual Apps and Desktops, or VMware Horizon庐.

This series aims to share the seemingly infinite number of ways you can optimize a Windows environment, with something for beginners as well as administrators familiar with optimizations but looking to deliver an even better experience within their environment.

Of course, the optimizations provided in this blog series are intended only as a guide. Be sure to vet any optimizations carefully and test the optimizations described in this series internally before pushing the changes to your production environment.

The first entry covered Active Setup. The second entry covered the Microsoft庐 Store. The third entry covered Services and Scheduled Tasks. In each case, we discussed what each piece is, how it works, and how to optimize it.

This blog addresses Startup Items, which includes Run and RunOnce Registry Keys, as well as the Startup folder that exists in each user鈥檚 profile. More specifically, we will discuss their purpose, how they work, and what can be done with them for the purposes of optimization.

26 min read
Jake Norman

Operating systems can end up being a lot of work for administrators; work to configure the image, work to install the applications, and work to provide the best user experience possible. As with any software, what is provided to you is what the developer intended, but not necessarily what you want or need for your end users.

This blog series introduces you to Windows庐 Operating System (OS) optimizations, starting with version 1903. I will attempt to keep these optimizations as environment agnostic as possible. Hopefully, these optimizations will be just as good to administrators of physical machines as to a virtual environment utilizing Nutanix Frame庐, Citrix庐 Virtual Apps and Desktops, or VMware Horizon庐.

This series aims to share the seemingly infinite number of ways you can optimize a Windows environment, with something for beginners as well as administrators familiar with optimizations but looking to deliver an even better experience within their environment.

Of course, the optimizations provided in this blog series are intended only as a guide. Be sure to vet any optimizations carefully and test the optimizations described in this series internally before pushing the changes to your production environment.

The first entry covered Active Setup. The second entry covered the Microsoft庐 Store. In each case, we discussed what each piece is, how it works, and how to optimize it.

This blog addresses two sections, specifically Services & Scheduled Tasks. More specifically, we will discuss their purpose, how they work, and what can be done to optimize them. These sections of the Windows OS have been around for a long time and while they do not change often, their ability to cause havoc in an environment has been thoroughly documented, see some examples here and here.

14 min read
Jake Norman

Operating systems can end up being a lot of work for administrators. Work to configure the image, work to install the applications, and work to provide the best user experience possible. As with any software, what is provided to you is what the developer intended, but not necessarily what you want or need for your end users.

This blog series introduces you to Windows庐 Operating System (OS) optimizations, starting with version 1903. I will attempt to keep these optimizations as environment agnostic as possible. Hopefully, these optimizations will be just as good to administrators of physical machines as to a virtual environment utilizing Nutanix Frame庐, Citrix庐, or VMware Horizon庐 virtual desktop infrastructure.

This series aims to share the seemingly infinite number of ways you can optimize a Windows environment, with something for beginners as well as administrators familiar with optimizations, but are looking to deliver an even better experience within their environment. Of course, the optimizations provided in this blog series are intended only as a guide. Be sure to test the optimizations described in this series internally before pushing the changes to your production environment.

The previous entry of this series covered Active Setup. We discussed what Active Setup is, how it works, and how to optimize it.

This blog addresses the Microsoft庐 Store platform: its purpose, how it works, and what can be done with it. This particular area of the OS is continually changing and, as such, will require constant management to optimize in a way that works best for your organization. This blog potentially saves even more headaches than any other blog in this series.

9 min read
Jake Norman

Operating systems can end up being a lot of work for administrators. Work to configure the image, work to install the applications, and work to provide the best user experience possible. As with any software, what is provided to you is what the developer intended, but not necessarily what you want or need for your end users.

This blog series introduces you to Microsoft Windows庐 Operating System (OS) optimizations, starting with version 1903. I will attempt to keep these optimizations as environment agnostic as possible. Hopefully, these optimizations will be just as good to administrators of physical machines as to a virtual environment utilizing Nutanix庐 Frame, Citrix庐, or VMware庐 Horizon solutions.

This series aims to share the seemingly infinite number of ways you can optimize a Windows environment, with something for beginners as well as administrators familiar with optimizations but looking to deliver an even better experience within your environment.

Of course the optimizations provided in this blog series are intended only as a guide. Be sure to test the optimizations described in this series internally before pushing the changes to your production environment.

This installment addresses Active Setup: its purpose, how it works, and what can be done with it. This particular area of the OS is criminally underused as a method of optimization. As such, it should provide useful information to a wide range of readers.